How to Interpret the Bible (Cómo Interpretar la Biblia)

By Matt Slick
 

The Bible is God’s Word. But some of the interpretations derived from it are not.  There are many cults and Christian groups that use the Bible, claiming their interpretations are correct.  Too often, however, the interpretations not only differ dramatically but are clearly contradictory.  This does not mean that the Bible is a confusing document. Rather, the problem lies in those who interpret and the methods they use.

We need, as best as can be had, the guidance of the Holy Spirit in interpreting God’s Word.

Because we are sinners, we are incapable of interpreting God’s word perfectly all of the time.  The body, mind, will, and emotions are affected by sin and make 100% interpretive accuracy impossible.  This does not mean that accurate understanding of God’s Word is impossible.  But it does mean that we need to approach His word with care, humility, and reason. Additionally, we need, as best as can be had, the guidance of the Holy Spirit in interpreting God’s Word.  After all, the Bible is inspired by God and is addressed to His people.  The Holy Spirit helps us to understand what God’s word means and how to apply it.

On the human level, to lessen the errors that come in our interpretations, we need to look at some basic biblical interpretive methods.  I’ll list some of the principles in the form of questions and then apply them one at a time to a passage of Scripture.

I offer the following principles as guidelines for examining a passage.  They are not exhaustive, nor are they set in concrete.

  1. Who wrote/spoke the passage and to whom was it addressed?
  2. What does the passage say?
  3. Are there any words or phrases in the passage that need to be examined?
  4. What is the immediate context?
  5. What is the broader context in the chapter and book?
  6. What are the related verses to the passage’s subject and how do they affect the understanding of this passage?
  7. What is the historical and cultural background?
  8. What do I conclude about the passage?
  9. Do my conclusions agree or disagree with related areas of Scripture and others who have studied the passage?
  10. What have I learned and what must I apply to my life?

In order to teach you how these questions can affect your interpretation of a passage, I have chosen one which, when examined closely, may lead you into a very different interpretation than what is commonly held.  I leave it to you to determine if my interpretation is accurate.

The passage that I am going to use is Matt. 24:40, "Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left," (NIV).

1. Who wrote/spoke the passage and who was it addressed to?

Jesus spoke the words and they were recorded by Matthew.  Jesus spoke them to His disciples in response to a question, which we will get to later.

2. What does the passage say?

The passage simply says that one out of two men in a field will be taken.  It doesn’t say where, why, when, or how.  It just says one will be taken. It doesn’t define the field as belonging to someone or in a particular place.

3. Are there any words in the passage that need to be examined?

No particular word in this verse really stands out as needing to be examined, but to follow this exercise, I will use the word "taken."  By using a Strong Concordance and a dictionary of New Testament words (Vine’s, for example), I can check the Greek word and learn about it.  The word in Greek is paralambano.  It means "1) to take to, to take with one’s self, to join to one’s self, 2) to receive something transmitted."

A point worth mentioning about word studies is that a word means what it means in context.  However, by examining how a word is used in multiple contexts, the meaning of the word can take on a new dimension.  For example, the word for "love" in Greek is "agapao."  It is generally believed to mean "divine love."  This seems obvious, since it is used in John 3:16 in that way.  However, the same word is used in Luke 11:43.  Jesus says, "Woe to you Pharisees, because you love the most important seats in the synagogues and greetings in the marketplaces," (NIV).  The word used there is "agapao."  It would seem then that the meaning of the word might mean something more along the lines of "total commitment to."

However, we must be careful not to insert a meaning of a word from one context into that of another.  For example: 1) That new cadet is green. 2) That tree is green.  The first green means "new and inexperienced."  The second one means the color green.  Would we want to impose the contextual meaning of one into the other?  It wouldn’t be a good idea.

4. What is the immediate context?

This is where this particular verse will come alive.  The immediate context is as follows, Matt. 24:37-42, "As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.  38For in the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark; 39and they knew nothing about what would happen until the flood came and took them all away.  That is how it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.  40Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left.  41Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and the other left.  42Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come," (NIV).

Immediately we can see that the person taken in verse 40 is paralleled by people being taken in verse 39.  That is, the "being taken" are of the same kind.

A further question needs to be asked.  Who was taken in verse 39?  Was it Noah and his family or was it the people who were eating and drinking? The answer to that question might help us understand the original passage better.  Therefore, the next interpretive step will help us greatly.

5. What is the broader context in the chapter and book?

A passage should always be looked at in context, not only in its immediate context of the verses directly before and after it, but also in the context of the chapter it is in and the book in which it is written.

Jesus’ discourse from which our verse was taken began with a question.  Jesus had just left the temple and in verse 2 told His disciples that "… not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down." Then in verse 3 the disciples asked Jesus, "Tell us," they said, "when will this happen, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?" (NIV).  Jesus then goes on to prophesy about things to come at the end of the age.  He speaks of false Christs, of tribulation, of the sun being darkened, of His return, and of two men in a field where one will be taken and the other left.

The context, then, is eschatological.  That means that it deals with the last things, or the time shortly before Jesus’ return.  Many people think that this verse in Matt. 24:40 refers to the rapture spoken of in 1 Thess. 4:16-17.  It may.  But it is interesting to note that the context of the verse seems to suggest that the wicked are taken, not the good.

Now, about this time you might be thinking that this method of interpreting passages isn’t that good.  After all, the "one taken, one left" verse is obviously about the rapture.  Right?  Well, maybe.  You see, we all come to the Bible with preconceived ideas.  Sometimes they are right, sometimes wrong.  We should always be ready to have our understanding of the Bible challenged by what it says.  If we are not willing, then we are prideful.  And God is distant from the proud (Psalm 138:6).

6. What are the related verses to the passage’s subject and how do they affect the understanding of this passage?

It just so happens that there are related verses, in fact, a parallel passage found in Luke 17:26-27. "Just as it was in the days of Noah, so also will it be in the days of the Son of Man.  27People were eating, drinking, marrying and being given in marriage up to the day Noah entered the ark.  Then the flood came and destroyed them all," (NIV).

Immediately we discover that related verses do indeed affect how we understand our initial verse.  It is clear from this passage in Luke that the ones taken by the flood are those who were eating and drinking and being given in marriage.  In other words, it wasn’t the godly people who were taken, it was the wicked.

As you can see, this has a profound impact on how we understand our passage in Matt. 24:40.  Does the context suggest that the one in the field who is taken is the one who is wicked?  Also, how does this context affect my preconceived ideas about this verse?  Let’s read the verse again in context. Matt. 24:37-42, "As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.  38For in the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark; 39and they knew nothing about what would happen until the flood came and took them all away.  That is how it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.  40Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left.  41Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and the other left.  42"Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come," (NIV).

What do you think now?  Is the one taken the good or the bad?  Also, does this verse refer to the rapture or not?

Just asking.

Of related interest is a passage in Matt. 13:24-30 where Jesus gives the parable of the sower who sows good seed in his field and someone sows tares.  The servants asked if they should go immediately and gather up the wheat.  But, in verse 30, Jesus says, "Let both grow together until the harvest.  At that time I will tell the harvesters: First collect the weeds and tie them in bundles to be burned; then gather the wheat and bring it into my barn."

The point worth noting here is that the first ones gathered are the weeds, not the wheat.  This is most interesting since Jesus explains the parable in Matt. 13:36-43 and states that they will be cast into the furnace.

Additionally, when we turn to Luke 17, which is the parallel passage of Matt. 24, we discover that the disciples ask Jesus a question in response to Jesus’ statement that "two will be in the field and one will be taken." In verse 37 they ask, "Where, Lord?"  He [Jesus] replied, "Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather."

They are taken to a place of death.

7. What is the historical and cultural background?

This is a more difficult question to answer.  It requires a bit more research.  A commentary is worth examining here, since they usually provide the historic and cultural backgrounds that help to unravel the text.

In this context, Israel was under Roman rule.  They had been denied the right of capital punishment, of self-rule, and the ability to wage war.  Rome had dominated the small nation.  Judaism was tolerated among the Roman leadership.  After all, Israel was a small far-away country with a people that were fanatical about their religion.  So, Rome allowed Israel to be ruled by Jewish political puppets.

The Temple was the place of worship for the Israelite community.  It was there that the blood sacrifices were made by the high priest for the atonement of the nation.  It had taken 46 years to build (John 2:20). Jesus said the temple would be destroyed, which prompted the question which lead to His discourse which contains the passage we are examining.

Culturally, the Jewish people were dedicated to the Old Testament.  Within those pages were prophecies of the Messiah, of the end of the age, and of the delivery from bondage.  The Jewish people knew that, and were in a state of expectation.  Along comes Jesus with miracles and words of great power.   Naturally, they would look to him as a possible deliverer.

8. What do I conclude about the passage?

Since the context of the passage suggests that it is the wicked that are taken, I am going to conclude that the one taken in the field is not the good, but the bad.  I also am tempted to conclude that the wicked are taken to a place of judgment.

9. Do my conclusions agree or disagree with related areas of scripture and others who have studied the passage?

I’ve already presented other verses which seem to agree with my conclusion.  However, it is not in agreement with all of the commentaries I’ve read on this verse.  At this point I would need to present my conclusion to others to see what they think.  Just because I studied the Word and arrived at a conclusion does not mean that it is correct.  But it doesn’t mean it is wrong either.

By consulting with others, by examining the word again, and by seeking God and his illumination, I can only hope to arrive at the best possible conclusion about a passage.

10. What have I learned and what must I apply to my life?

Interpretation of scripture is for a purpose: To understand God’s word more accurately.  With a better understanding of His word, we can then more accurately apply it to the area that it addresses.  In this case, the passage deals with an area of the future, and area of judgment.  It is information that Jesus has revealed and that He wants us to know about.  The application then would be that God will execute judgment upon the unrighteous at the end of the age.

Concluding remarks

This article is only an illustration.  It is basic and does not cover all the points of biblical interpretation.  But it does give a direction and an example for you to apply.  As I said before, pray.  Read His word.  Look into the scriptures as best you can with as much understanding and skill as is possible.  Be humble in your approach and test everything by the Bible.

One last thing: did you agree with my conclusion?

http://www.carm.org/

La Biblia es la Palabra de Dios. Pero algunas de las interpretaciones que se derivan de ésta, realmente no lo son. Existen muchos falsos cultos y grupos Cristianos que usan la Biblia, clamando que sus interpretaciones son correctas; sin embargo, con demasiada frecuencia las interpretaciones difieren no sólo dramáticamente, sino que son claramente contradictorias. Esto no significa que la Biblia sea un documento confuso; más bien, el problema descansa en aquellos que la interpretan y los métodos que usan.

Tanto como podamos, necesitamos la guía del Espíritu Santo para interpretar la Palabra de Dios. Debido a que somos pecadores, somos incapaces de interpretarla perfectamente en todo momento. El cuerpo, la mente, la voluntad y las emociones están afectados por el pecado y hace que el 100% de su interpretación sea imposible. Esto no significa que el entendimiento preciso de la Palabra de Dios sea imposible. Pero por otro lado, significa que necesitamos acercarnos a Su Palabra con cuidado, humildad y razón; después de todo, la Biblia es inspirada por Dios y dirigida a Su pueblo. El Espíritu Santo nos ayuda a entender lo que significa Su Palabra y cómo aplicarla.

A nivel humano, y para disminuir los errores que llegan con nuestras interpretaciones, necesitamos observar algunos métodos bíblicos básicos interpretativos. Enumeraré algunos de los principios en forma de preguntas y los aplicaré uno a uno a un pasaje de la Escritura.

Ofrezco los siguientes principios como guías para examinar un pasaje. Sin embargo, permítame aclarar, que estas guías no son exhaustivas ni tampoco definitivas.

  1. ¿Quién escribió/habló el pasaje y a quién estaba dirigido?
  2. ¿Qué dice el pasaje?
  3. ¿Hay algunas palabras o frases en el pasaje que necesitan ser examinados?
  4. ¿Cuál es el contexto inmediato?
  5. ¿Cuál es el contexto más amplio en el capítulo y libro?
  6. ¿Cuáles son los versículos relacionados al tema del pasaje y cómo afectan estos el entendimiento de este pasaje?
  7. ¿Cuál es el fondo histórico y cultural?
  8. ¿Qué concluyo acerca del pasaje?
  9. ¿Están mis conclusiones de acuerdo o en desacuerdo con las áreas relacionadas de la Escritura y otros que han estudiado el pasaje?
  10. ¿Qué es lo que he aprendido y qué debo aplicar a mi vida?

Para poder enseñarle a Usted cómo estas preguntas pueden afectar su interpretación de un pasaje, he escogido uno, el cual examinado muy de cerca, puede llevarlo a Usted a una interpretación muy diferente a la que generalmente se sostiene. Dejaré que Usted determine si mi interpretación es exacta.

El pasaje que utilizaré es Mt 24:40: “Entonces estarán dos en el campo; el uno será tomado, y el otro será dejado.”

1.    ¿Quién escribió/habló el pasaje y a quién estaba dirigido?

Estas palabras de Jesús, y registradas por Marcos, las habló a Sus discípulos en respuesta a una pregunta, a la que llegaremos posteriormente.

2.    ¿Qué dice el pasaje?
El pasaje simplemente dice que uno de los que se encuentran en un campo será tomado.  Éste no dice a dónde, por qué, cuándo, o cómo. Sólo dice que uno será tomado. No define     el campo como si perteneciera a alguien o tampoco lo define como un sitio particular.

3.    ¿Hay algunas palabras o frases en el pasaje que necesitan ser examinados?
Ninguna palabra en particular sobresale como para que sea examinada, pero para continuar con este ejercicio usaré la palabra “tomado.” Al usar una Concordancia Strong y un diccionario de palabras del Nuevo Testamento (por ejemplo, el de Vine), puedo revisar la palabra Griega y aprender acerca de la misma. La palabra en Griego es “paralambano”; la cual significa: 1) tomar a, tomar con uno mismo, unir a alguien; 2) recibir algo transmitido.

Un punto importante acerca del estudio de palabras es que una palabra significa lo que     esta significa en el contexto. Sin embargo, al examinar cómo una palabra es usada en contextos múltiples, el significado de la palabra puede tomar una nueva dimensión. Por ejemplo, la palabra en Griego para “amor” es “agapao”, la cual se cree generalmente, que significa “amor divino.”  Esto parece obvio, ya que es usada de esta forma en Jn 3:16.

Sin embargo, la misma palabra es usada en Lc 11:43 donde Jesús dice: “¡Ay de vosotros, fariseos! que amáis las primeras sillas en las sinagogas, y las salutaciones en las plazas.”  Aquí, la palabra usada es “agapao.” Parecería entonces que el significado de la palabra sería más bien “total entrega a.”

Sin embargo, debemos tener cuidado de no introducir el significado de una palabra de un contexto a otro. Por ejemplo: 1) Aquel nuevo cadete es verde. 2) Aquel árbol es verde. El primer verde significa “Inmaduro, nuevo y sin experiencia.” El segundo se refiere al color verde. ¿Quisiéramos imponer el significado contextual de uno a otro? Esto no sería una buena idea.

4.    ¿Cuál es el contexto inmediato?
Es aquí donde este versículo en particular vendría a tener sentido. El contexto inmediato es como sigue: “Mas como en los días de Noé, así será la venida del Hijo del Hombre. 38Porque como en los días antes del diluvio estaban comiendo y bebiendo, casándose y dando en casamiento, hasta el día en que Noé entró en el arca. 39y no entendieron hasta que vino el diluvio y se los llevó a todos, así será también la venida del Hijo del Hombre. 40Estarán dos en el campo; el uno será tomado, y el otro será dejado. 41Dos mujeres estarán moliendo en un molino; la una será tomada, y la otra será dejada. 42Velad, pues, porque no sabéis a qué hora ha de venir vuestro Señor.” (Mt 24:37-42).

Podemos inmediatamente ver que la persona tomada en el versículo 40 es similar a las personas que están siendo tomadas en el versículo 39; esto es, la expresión “será tomado”, aplica en ambos casos.

Necesitamos responder una pregunta más: ¿Quién fue tomado en el versículo 39? ¿Fue Noé y su familia o fueron las personas que estaban comiendo y bebiendo? La respuesta a esa pregunta podría ayudarle a entender mejor el pasaje original. Por lo tanto, el próximo paso para interpretar nos ayudará grandemente.

5.    ¿Cuál es el contexto más amplio en el capítulo y libro?
Un pasaje tiene que ser siempre visto en el contexto; no sólo en el contexto inmediato de los versículos que se encuentran antes y después, sino también en el contexto del capítulo donde se encuentra y el libro en el cual fue escrito.

El discurso de Jesús, del cual, nuestro versículo fue tomado empezó con una pregunta. Jesús, recién había salido del templo y en el versículo 2 le dijo a Sus discípulos “…que no quedará aquí piedra sobre piedra, que no sea derribada.” Entonces, en el versículo 3 los discípulos le preguntaron a Jesús: “Dinos, ¿cuándo serán estas cosas, y qué señal habrá de tu venida, y del fin del siglo?” Jesús entonces habla acerca de la profecía de las cosas que han de venir al fin del siglo. Él habla de los falsos Cristos, de la tribulación, del sol que se oscurecerá, de Su regreso, y de los dos en un campo donde uno será tomado y el otro será dejado.

El contexto en el cual se está hablando es escatológico. Esto significa que trata acerca de las últimas cosas o del tiempo breve antes del regreso de Jesús. Muchas personas piensan que este versículo en Mt 24:40 se refiere al rapto del cual se habla en 1 Ts 4:16-17. Esto podría ser; pero es interesante notar que el contexto del versículo parece sugerir que son los malvados los que serán tomados, no los buenos.

Ahora bien; en este momento Usted podría estar pensando que este método de interpretar pasajes no es bueno. Después de todo el versículo de “el uno será tomado, y el otro será dejado” es, obviamente acerca del rapto. ¿Correcto? Bueno, tal vez. Como puede ver, todos nosotros venimos a la Biblia con ideas preconcebidas; algunas veces estas son correctas, algunas veces equivocadas. Nosotros tenemos que estar siempre listos para que nuestro entendimiento sea retado por lo que la Biblia dice. Si no estamos dispuestos, entonces somos orgullosos y Dios está distante del orgulloso. (Sal 138:6).

6.    ¿Cuáles son los versículos relacionados al tema del pasaje y cómo afectan estos el entendimiento de este pasaje?
Sucede que hay versículos relacionados; de hecho, un pasaje paralelo se encuentra en Lc 17:26-27: “Como fue en los días de Noé, así también será en los días del Hijo del Hombre. 27Comían, bebían, se casaban y se daban en casamiento, hasta el día en que entró Noé en el arca, y vino el diluvio y los destruyó a todos.”

De hecho, descubrimos inmediatamente que los versículos relacionados, afectan nuestro entendimiento del versículo inicial. Es claro en este pasaje de Lucas que aquellos que fueron destruidos por el diluvio son aquellos que estaban comiendo y bebiendo y dándose en casamiento. En otras palabras, no fueron los piadosos que fueron llevados, sino los malvados.

Como puede ver, esto tiene un impacto profundo en cómo entendemos nuestro pasaje en Mt 24:40. ¿Sugiere el contexto que aquel que es tomado en el campo, es el malvado? Ahora bien, ¿cómo afecta este contexto mis ideas preconcebidas acerca de este versículo? Vamos a leer otra vez el versículo en el contexto: “Mas como en los días de Noé, así será la venida del Hijo del Hombre. 38Porque como en los días antes del diluvio estaban comiendo y bebiendo, casándose y dando en casamiento, hasta el día en que Noé entró en el arca. 39y no entendieron hasta que vino el diluvio y se los llevó a todos, así será también la venida del Hijo del Hombre. 40Estarán dos en el campo; el uno será tomado, y el otro será dejado. 41Dos mujeres estarán moliendo en un molino; la una será tomada, y la otra será dejada. 42Velad, pues, porque no sabéis a qué hora ha de venir vuestro Señor.”
(Mt 24:37-42).

¿Qué piensa ahora? El que es tomado, ¿es el bueno o el malo? ¿Se refiere este versículo al rapto o no? Sólo pregunto.

De interés relacionado es una pasaje en Mt 13:24-30 donde Jesús les habló de la parábola del sembrador el cual siembra buena semilla en su campo pero brota la cizaña. Los siervos le preguntan que si van y la arrancan; pero en el versículo 30 Jesús dice: “Dejad crecer juntamente lo uno y lo otro hasta la siega; y al tiempo de la siega yo diré a los segadores: ‘Recoged primero la cizaña, y atadla en manojos para quemarla; pero recoged el trigo en mi granero.’”

El punto que vale la pena anotar aquí es que lo primero en recogerse es la cizaña, no el trigo. Esto es más interesante ya que Jesús explica la parábola en Mt 13:36-43 y declara que ellos serán echados en el horno de fuego.

Cuando adicionalmente regresamos a Lc 17:1, el cual es el pasaje paralelo de Mateo 24, descubrimos que los discípulos le hacen a Jesús una pregunta en respuesta a la declaración de Jesús de que “estarán dos en el campo; el uno será tomado, y el otro será dejado.” En el versículo 37 de Lucas 17, ellos preguntan: “… ‘¿Dónde Señor?’ Él les dijo: ‘Donde estuviere el cuerpo, allí se juntarán también los buitres.” Ellos, son llevados a un lugar de muerte.

7.    ¿Cuál es el fondo histórico y cultural?
Esta es una pregunta más difícil de responder ya que requiere algo más de investigación. Un comentario de la Biblia valdría ser examinado aquí debido a que estos usualmente nos suministran los fondos históricos y culturales que ayudan a relevar el texto.

En este contexto, Israel se encontraba bajo el dominio de Roma. A ellos se les habían negado el derecho a la pena capital, de autogobierno y la habilidad para hacer la guerra. Roma tenía dominada a toda la pequeña nación. El Judaísmo era tolerado entre el liderazgo Romano; después de todo, Israel era un pequeño país bastante alejado de Roma con personas que eran fanáticas acerca de su religión. Así que Roma le permitía a Israel ser gobernada por marionetas políticas Judías.

El Templo era el lugar de adoración para la comunidad Israelita y el lugar donde se ofrecían sacrificios de expiación para la nación llevados a cabo por el sumo sacerdote. Se habían necesitado 46 años para construirlo. (Jn 2:20). Jesús dijo que el templo sería destruido, lo cual provocó la prontitud de la pregunta la cual llevó a Su discurso contenido en el pasaje que estamos examinando.
Culturalmente el pueblo Judío estaba entregado al Antiguo Testamento. Dentro de aquellas páginas estaban las profecías relacionadas con el Mesías, el final del siglo y la liberación de la esclavitud. El pueblo Judío sabía esto y se encontraba en un estado de expectativa. Con todo esto, llega Jesús con milagros y palabras de gran poder. Naturalmente, ellos lo mirarían a Él como un posible libertador.

8.    ¿Qué concluyo acerca del pasaje?
Debido a que el contexto del pasaje sugiere de que son los malvados los que son tomados, concluiré que aquel que es tomado en el campo no es el bueno sino el malo. También estoy tentado a concluir que los malvados son tomados a un lugar de juicio.

9.    ¿Están mis conclusiones de acuerdo o en desacuerdo con las áreas relacionadas de la Escritura y otros que han estudiado el pasaje?
Ya he presentado otros versículos que parecen estar de acuerdo con mi conclusión. Sin embargo, no está de acuerdo con todos los comentarios que he leído acerca de este versículo. En este punto, necesitaría presentar mi conclusión a otros para ver que es lo que piensan. Debido a que estudié la Palabra y llegué a una conclusión esto no significa que ésta es correcta; pero tampoco significa que esté equivocada. Al consultar con otros, al examinar la Palabra otra vez y al buscar a Dios y Su iluminación, yo sólo puedo desear llegar a la mejor conclusión posible acerca de un pasaje.

10.    ¿Qué es lo que he aprendido y qué debo aplicar a mi vida?
La interpretación de la Escritura tiene un propósito: Entender la Palabra de Dios con más precisión ya que con un mayor entendimiento de Su Palabra, podemos aplicarla con más precisión al área a la que está dirigida. En este caso, el pasaje trata con un área del futuro y un área de juicio. La aplicación entonces sería que Dios ejecutará juicio sobre el injusto al final de los tiempos.

Comentarios Concluyentes

Este artículo es sólo una ilustración. Es básico y no cubre todos los puntos de la interpretación bíblica, pero da una dirección y un ejemplo para que Usted aplique. Como dije anteriormente, ore; lea Su Palabra; investigue las Escrituras lo mejor que pueda con mucho entendimiento y habilidad como sea posible. Sea humilde en su acercamiento y pruebe todas las cosas por la Biblia.

Una última cosa: ¿Está de acuerdo con mi conclusión?

http://www.miapic.com/

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s